Sports and activity information for the ALL STAR in your house

 

Web Search

Baseball
Basketball
Bowling
Crew (Rowing)
Cross Country Running
Cross Country Skiing
Competitive Biking
Football
Fencing
Field Hockey
Golf
Gymnastics
Hockey
Ice Skating
Inline Skating
Lacrosse
Martial Arts
Rock Climbing
Rugby
Skateboarding
Skiing
Snowboarding
Soccer


 
Softball
Snowmobiling
Snow Tubing
Surfing
Swimming
Tennis
Track and Field
Volleyball
Wrestling
Jr Lifeguard Program
How to Choose a Sport
Why Participate in Sports
When to Start Sports
Reasons to Volunteer
Fundraising Ideas
Travel Team Participation
How to Make a Team Banner
How to Make a Team Bench Warmer
Computer Made Sports Magnets
Football Number Maze
Fall Sports
Spring Sports
Winter Sports
Benefits of Summer Camps
Selecting Cleats
Why Participate in Sports
When to Start Sports
Sports and Keeping Healthy
Ideas for Coach Presents
Ten Commandments For Sports Parents
Offside Rule for Soccer Moms
What Parents Need to Understand About Kids and Sporting Events
How to Locate Sports Programs
Sports for the Child That Does Not Like Teams
Creating a Sports Bulletin Board
Spalding's Rookie Gear - Innovative Equipment For 8 and under
Creative Ideas For Building Team Camaraderie
Preparing Your Child For Not Making A Team
Best Sports to Keep Your Child Fit For Life
Soccer Number Maze
 

Baseball

Tips for Purchasing a Baseball Bat

Tee Ball Senior Major Terminology
Minor Junior Big Positions

Selecting a  glove

Buying a baseball Buying a Baseball Bat Baseball Poem
General Structure History of Baseball

 

  Purchasing a bat, whether you are selecting for a Little League baseball team or for a high school team, is a personal decision.  You must select a bat that fits the skill level and body configuration of the batter.  Height, weight and hitting strength will help you to determine the right bat.  New technology has created bats that will enhance performance but also are tailored to an a player's strengths. Having a heavy bat does not necessarily mean you are going to hit a home run. The bottom line is that baseball bats are expensive so it is important to make the right choice.

  To help select the right bat for you here are some helpful guidelines:

BAT MATERIALS

The world of bats offers a variety of choices in materials.  Each material provides unique qualities as well as advantages for the player.  The types of materials that you will find are aluminum, graphite/titanium lined and wood.

Aluminum:

  • Aluminum bats are very light and thin and allow the ball to travel farther.

  • Aluminum bats are enhanced with other alloys such as Zinc, Copper, and/or Magnesium.  Depending on the combinations of materials the bat may have more strength or durability.

  • These bats also come in single-layer or double-layer construction.  Double layer offers more durability and power.

  • Cryogenically treated aluminum where the alloy is frozen and reheated provides greater durability, less vibration and 2-4% greater distance.

  • Cost are generally higher for aluminum bats.

  • Check league rule to see if this type of bat is acceptable.

Graphite/Titanium lined

  • Graphite and Titanium are lighter and stronger materials.

  • They are added to thinner-wall aluminum bats.

  • This creates a lighter bat and allows for an increasing player swing speed.

  • These materials help to reduce vibration and the sting of ball shock.

Wood

  • No doubt that a wood bat offers a classic feel.

  • Bats made of this material offer more choices in shape and taper.  This allows for a better fit to the players swing.

  • Make sure the grain is long and wide on the bat.  This indicates the age and density of the tree that was used to create the bat.

  • This type of bat will crack and break easier.

  • It will have far less hitting power than a metal bat.

Kids can use wood or non-wood in Little League, but non-wood seems to be the preference for most kids and what many coaches use. You may find some debate about the dangers with non-wood, because the ball comes off faster and therefore the pitcher and in field players may not have time to react. Studies by Little League show that is really not a problem with little children but you must check with you league to be sure that are approved.

GET A FEEL FOR THE BAT

If you want to buy a bat, then talk to your child's coach and they should be able to give you a pretty good idea as to where to start on length and weight.  It is extremely important to make sure the bat meets the standards for your league. You donít want to buy a bat that your child canít use at games.

There are some standards for selecting bat length based on age, height and weight to help set you in the right direction. See the charts below for this information.  It is important to remember that your child should experience the bat for himself before you actually buy it.  This is the best way for him to determine how comfortable he would be using the bat.

When selecting a bat it should be held it in the players hands and it should feel comfortable.  The player should have total control over the bat.  Once the general length has been determined the player should stand in a batter's box and make sure he is able to reach the outside of the plate for full coverage.

Using age as a guide to determine the length of bat needed:

Age Length
5 - 7 years old 24"-26"
8-9 years old 26"-28"
10 years old 28"-29"
11 -12 years old 30"-31"
13-1 4 years old 31"-32"
15 -16 years old 32"-33"
Over 17 34"

Using height and weight as a guide to determine the length of bat needed:

 

Your height (inches)

Your weight (pounds)

36-40

41-44

45-48

49-52

53-56

57-60

61-64

65-68

69-72

73+

Bat length

less than 60

26"

27"

28"

29"

29"

 

 

 

 

 

61-70

27"

27"

28"

29"

30"

30"

 

 

 

 

71-80

 

28"

28"

29"

30"

30"

31"

 

 

 

81-90

 

28"

29"

29"

30"

30"

31"

32"

 

 

91-100

 

28"

29"

30"

30"

31"

31"

32"

 

 

101-110

 

29"

29"

30"

30"

31"

31"

32"

 

 

111-120

 

29"

29"

30"

30"

31"

31"

32"

 

 

121-130

 

29"

29"

30"

30"

31"

32"

33"

33"

 

131-140

 

29"

30"

30"

31"

31"

32"

33"

33"

 

141-150

 

 

30"

30"

31"

31"

32"

33"

33"

 

151-160

 

 

30"

31"

31"

32"

32"

33"

33"

33"

161-170

 

 

 

31"

31"

32"

32"

33"

33"

34"

171-180

 

 

 

 

 

32"

33"

33"

34"

34"

180+

 

 

 

 

 

 

33"

33"

34"

34"

A great tip to see if a bat is the right weight is to grip the bottom portion of the bat with the TOP hand (I.E. right hand if the player is a right handed batter), and then extend the arm out completely straight to the side.  If the batter is able to hold the bat in this position for at LEAST 20 seconds without the arm shaking or slouching or the elbow bending then it is a good weight.

If you have a general size idea and know the league rules, then you need to look at the minus numbers on the bat.  Bat sizes are listed by minus numbers. This number is calculated by taking the length of the bat and subtracting its weight. For example, a 30 inch bat weighing 19 ounces would be a -11.  The higher numbers mean that the bat is long but is not heavy while the lower numbers mean a heavier bat for the length.  Different leagues and/or different levels of play, use these numbers for requirements.   Little League does have a list of approved bats so if you are having trouble with all the numbers, then you can click here to see specific models: Little League Bats

BASEBALL BAT TYPES

  • Tee-Ball Bats
    Tee-Ball bats are for ages approx 5 thru 7. They are generally used in tee-ball and coach pitch leagues. The bat barrel is 2 1/4 inch in diameter. Bat lengths range from 25 inch to 27 inch. Bat weight is measured in weight drop, which varies between brands and models. Heavier bats are around minus 7 weight drop, lighter bats are around minus 13.

  • Little League Bats
    Little League bats are for ages approx 7 thru 12. They are used in leagues including Little League, Babe Ruth, Dixie Youth, PONY, and AABC. The bat barrel is 2 1/4 inch in diameter. Bat lengths range from 28 inch to 32 inch. Bat weight is measured in weight drop, which varies between brands and models. Heavier bats are around minus 7 weight drop, lighter bats are around minus 13.

  • Senior League Bats
    Senior League bats are for ages approx 10 thru 13. They are used in certain travel and tournament leagues. The bat barrel is available in 2 5/8 inch (high school regulation), and 2 3/4 inch (Big Barrel). Bat lengths range from 28 inch to 32 inch. Bat weight is measured in weight drop, which varies between brands and models. Heavier bats are around minus 5 weight drop, lighter bats are around minus 11.

  • High School / College Bats
    High School / College bats are for ages approx 13 and up. They are used in most High School and College leagues. The bat barrel is 2 5/8 inch in diameter. Bat lengths range from 30 inch to 34 inch. Bat weight is measured in weight drop, which must be minus 3. Most leagues require an approved BESR stamp on the bat (Bat Exit Speed Rating).

BUY FOR THE SEASON

At the price you pay for bats it is tempting to select a bat that your child can use for a few years.  This appears to be a economical as well as logical idea.  The problem is that for a younger player, hitting is difficult and frustrating and a bat that is not the correct size will hinder your child's ability to connect with the ball.  With most young children failure is equated to quitting.  So buy for this season not for the future and give them the best chance at success.