Sports and activity information for the ALL STAR in your house

 

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Baseball

Purchasing a Baseball

Tee Ball Senior Major Terminology
Minor Junior Big Positions

Selecting a  glove

Buying a baseball Buying a Baseball Bat Baseball Poem
General Structure History of Baseball

You will find that baseballs come in a variety of sizes, materials and hardness.

 

 

The basic ball

Most baseballs are 9 inches in circumference.   Some leagues for under-10 year old players may use a slightly larger ball.   Softballs typically are 12 inches in circumference, while some women's and youth leagues use an 11 inch ball.

Materials

Balls are manufactured out of leather or synthetic leather.  Leather is used in the Major Leagues and other upper-level leagues.  Synthetic leather is used primarily for balls in the Little League age group and younger

There are also safety balls for younger players. "Safety balls" are engineered to play like a real ball without the sting of a hard ball. They are known as "Reduced Injury Factor" or RIF balls, they roll and bounce like their harder balls, but don't hurt as much if the player gets hit.